Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster
Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster

Sea Island Cotton | Gossypium Barbadense | Botanical Illustration | Poster

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A museum-quality poster with a vivid print of the plant Sea Island Cotton(Gossypium Barbadense, Gossypium tricuspidatum).

The botanical illustration is made on thick and durable matte paper.  The poster is a great wall art decoration for both homes and businesses. 

Great item for people interested in botany, nature and old vintage illustrations.

 

Sea Island Cotton (Gossypium barbadense), also known as an extra-long staple or creole cotton, is a species of a cotton plant.

The cotton harvested from the plant is commonly sold as Pima cotton. The name Pima was applied in honor of the Pima Indians, who helped raise the cotton on experimental farms in Arizona in the early 1900s.

The plant has also a long history of medicinal use.

The species is a tropical, frost-sensitive perennial that produces yellow flowers and has black seeds. It grows as a small, bushy tree and yields cotton with unusually long, silky fibers.

 

The original botanical illustration was done by Etienne Denisse and published in the lavishly-illustrated Flore d’Amérique (1843-46).

Etienne Denisse (1785 – 1861) was a lithographer for the French royal court and spent his early career at the botanical garden of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris.

He was soon employed by the French government to work in the French West Indies where he spent years illustrating and collecting plants from the region and sending specimens back to France.

 


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